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Origin and value of Garnet

If I may ask for some more knowledgeable Gemstone enthusiasts, I acquired this from an older lady , that said her husband bought her on one of their travels to Sir Lanka. It had never been removed from the original case in 30 years . He had intended on having a necklace made with it for her but recently passed away.


Thank you in advance for your time and help

Did a little research. Consolidated Equity Associates is no longer in operation. Which means there is no longer a point on contact to reach to verify the appraisal. 2 options: 1. Keep as is in case and display as a personal museum piece (novelty value). 2. Take to a modern appraiser for an updated appraisal.

I personally like the novelty of using it as a museum/display piece.

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Bit further digging, It appears that Consolidated Equity Associates opened in 1983, and closed in 1985. An image search of this company generates a few additional pictures of gemstones in cases, but due to age, and how short a period that this company was in operation, I would treat the information within the report as potentially incorrect.

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Thank you for your information. I have been intrigued at the fire that Sparks from inside Gemstone.
Sincerely
Michelle Warden
Hope to be a Gemologist someday. Study all the time. Love history of Gemstone’s and How they miraculously form.

It’s likely pyrope, they could probably get $100ct for it on Gemrockauctions.com

It’s a good size, looks a little bit shallow and would probably set up very nicely, if you put a mirror finish behind it it gives a nice glow in jewelry.

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Thank you for your time and information.
It is gorgeous when it’s in a good light source it looks like an Amber rich fire is inside it.
I guess to make sure of value I’ll send it to the GIA let them check it out. I am afraid to even attempt to remove the gorgeous Garnet.
Thank you again :blush:
I appreciate it…
Love pyrope Garnet as well. Only had 2 pieces of Pyrope Garnet before it favors it… just not sure. Since the little older lady said her husband bought it on a cruise that docked in are around Sir Lanka, bought for her to someday make her a nice pendant with it. Never got around to it and it sit in a safe for approximately 30 years.
I feel like I’m holding an amazing piece of history and an incredible looking Gemstone.
Sincerely
Michelle Warden

I hate to be a killjoy, but when you say amber you are talking something with brown tones of red. Garden variety common garnets with brown tinged red colors which are typically a bit too dark (as this appears to be) are rather cheap stones, usually not over $5/ct in 5-10 ct sizes. The RI of 1.78 quoted on the certificate identifies almandine garnet;pyrope would be lower, about 1.756 or lower. Look up almandine garnets of this size on line and see what colors and prices you find on competitive sites. Garnet has seen a large rise in prices over what was true 20 years ago, but this is for pink, peach, orange, rose, raspberry and cherry reds of ideal saturations and hues. There are now numerous facebook groups where faceted stones and rough are advertised and sold, so you can at least see good photos and realistic asking prices. Most of the sites are for serious, knowledgeable buyers, so there is a lower limit on prices of about $100, so you won’t see any schlock. You can also ask about stones and find out from the seller whether they have sold or not, thus finding out something about actual transaction prices. Good way to get educated if you don’t mind spending the time. HTH, royjohn

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Thank you I will try that. It does have a raspberry tone especially in light.

I enjoy learning, learning everyday helps your brain stay healthy. ( Good for the soul as well if you enjoy learning and I love seeking more knowledge ).
Thank you
Sincerely,
Michelle Warden

That garnet could probably be recut into something much nicer. Really rich colored, well-cut, eye clean are selling at $100 to $120 per carat wholesale. Retail you can expect $240 per carat. But this particular garnet would have to be recut in order to have a chance at $100 per carat (but probably $50). I wouldn’t send to GIA, that won’t help the price and you already know what it is. Now, if you were told it was a ruby, then I would send to GIA.

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Thank you for your time and help.

Hi looks more like a Rhodolite garnet colour to me or may be Almandine/Rhodolite Loren457 I am surprised at the prices you are quoting even for a large garnet
just my thoughts thanks

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What prices are accurate for a Raspberry/Garnet that has been in this same orinigal presentation with a certificate from an older couple company no longer around. I do know for sure that the older lady I purchased this from traveled extensively with her husband to Sir Lanka and Many African cruises and stayed at many places across Africa. Her husband was generous on Jewerly for her and himself . As he collected lots of items one being Gemstones.
I really love the look of this Garnet and actually thought it looks more like a very rich colored Ruby.
I wished I had more access to archives and Gemologist tools. Have few , just getting started and Gemology tools and classes are not cheap. But so in love with the rich history and learning as much as I can absorb .
Thank you you all on here for help in any way possible. I value your input very much.
Sincerely
Michelle Warden

well I have looked at Gemworld international prices and for Upper Good to Lower fine quality is between 73 to 100 USD per carat wholesale but that is without grading the stone at all, it may grade below that level ??
thanks.

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Thank you for looking!
Teamwork International, would that be something I could purchase are is it a publication ?
Truly don’t know, but would love to subscribe if possible.
Thank you
I believe that it would be valuable to be able to look up certain Gems when uncertain. As a person seeking to get a Gemologist certification and hopeful a Jewelry Store. Be able to provide accurate information for myself and Customers.
Again I do appreciate your time. Sincerely,
Michelle Warden