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Ethiopian opals

So I’ve purchased many of these Ethiopian opals over the last year, and recently I’ve been doing buisness with an Indian gentleman whom is selling me almost “too good to be true” gems… Could anyone let me know if I’m being scammed and if these are fakes or true Natural Untreated Ethiopian Fire opals? Thanks

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Appraisal of natural or synthetic gemstones is near to impossible based on photos.
Observation and tests are necessary in order to give an opinion.
Find a gemologist near you.
best of luck!

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Your Ethiopian opals appear to be natural to me. Keeping in mind Ethiopian opals sell for roughly 10% of what equal size and quality Australian opals sell for, they can seem almost too good to be true. Perhaps you will find my article “Ethiopian Opals: Facts, Fears and Fairytales” of value:

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I have purchased many opals and have been very disappointed. Believed I was buying very good quality and they turned out to be glass, beautiful but still glass. Lab grown! I finally purchased a Presidium Gem Indicator which actually gave the final word - Glass. A special glass that is a plastic.
So be careful when what you buy, a Gem Indicator is actually protection but the dealer may be extremely insulted by it and they could even turn violent.

You are not testing triplets with the Presidium gem testee by any chance are you?

A pgi cannot distinguish opals.

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Presidium Gem Indicator is USELESS in separating natural opal from synthetics, imitations, glass, resin impregnated etc. I repeat - USELESS!!!

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obviously my point jbergman

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No, I was informed when purchased they were natural opals. When I used the Gem Indicator the rest results were always glass. Not 1 place did the Gem Indicator test Opal, always glass.
Using Google I read a certain type of glass is used in lab, synthetic or imitation opals.
Sorry I didn’t write down the name of the particular type of glass used.
I was very disappointed as I thought I was purchasing real, natural Opal both rough and faceted gemstones.

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You have to understand the Presidium Gem Indicator test glass!
It should of tested NIL❗

Presidium Gem Indicator is USELESS in separating natural opal from synthetics, imitations, glass, resin impregnated etc. I repeat - USELESS!!!

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I must admit, I have never used it to test opal but it has given me accurate results on sapphire, ruby, tanzanite, emerald, amethyst, citrine etc

GEE, I bet if you used it on Amethyst or Citrine you MIGHT have a similar result. Both are quartz (SiO2). Opal is primarily SiO2 and H20 (water). GLASS IS SiO2 (a super saturated semi-liquid made from sand,quartz) !!! You really have to have at least a rudimentary understanding of the tools you are using and what you are measuring. Curious why none of the “experts” pointed this out earlier. Disappointing.

and don’t we all love # Silicon dioxide

Whats your point? You only bark at people without stating anything.

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Unfortunately that seems to be the way a lot of people on this forum roll. It can be pretty intimidating posting as a newby.

I am on here because I have an interest in learning about my fathers hobby and i inherited my fathers stones when he passed. Now I am building on that collection and have a fascination with Garnets and Saphires and Rubies.

If someone feels the need to belittle me then quote "disappointed’ then I feel sorry for them. They obviously need some help having their head removed from a place it seems stuck and surly as a gemologist they should have the right tools available for removing objects from places where they are stuck.

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My point is several experts replied that his testing was useless. None offered any explanation as to why. I am certain that MY explanation was not the ONLY reason. That omission was disappointing. It had nothing t do with you.

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I will say one thing, I started looking up the chemical composition on many gemstones after your comment. It did make me curious.