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Emerald for Sale at Auction - Information

Hi - we are selling an emerald at auction on behalf of the US Bankruptcy Court in Nevada and little information is known about the specimen. I was curious if anyone could help point us in the right direction for information or who to speak with to learn more. The emerald will be sold regardless of price, we just want to try and do all we can for the courts!

Photos are attached below.

Thanks for your help!

Hudson





Dimensions and weight might help :thinking:

I forgot the dimensions, thank you! They are approximately 5" x 11" x 4". I will be sure to get the weight when I get back to the office!

I take it that is in inches? If so that thing is huge! Do you happen to know origin?
All the merry best at this wonderful time of year.
Otter

Hi Otter - It’s believed to be from Bahia and yes it’s in inches! We are trying to track down the official documents from the court as we speak.

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Hi Hudson. You might check this site and see if there is anything of similar quality and size to compare it to. The site is vetted more than an eBay type site.

But most of them are much smaller. As Otter said, that thing is big!

A licensed gemologist can appraise the value for you using industry standards. Nobody with good sense will buy a valuable gem by looking at internet pictures.

Thank you for sending this over! I’ll look at it and I really appreciate it!

Thank you for your help!

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This 1,400-gram Brazilian emerald specimen for sale on Etsy for $2,198 is a good comparison

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That specimen looks amazing. My suggestion is to have it appraised at GIA.

https://www.gia.edu/submit-a-gem-duplicate

They are the nations most presitgous appraisers for your specimen. My guess is that the cost of the appraisial will far out weigh the benefits. Documentation from GIA stating exactly what this specimen is, persumably emerald and if it is natural or not and it’s origin. The specium looks like an emerald and natural. If GIA documents that this is a natural emerald, you will get buyers from around the world. An rough emerald of this size is extremely rare and very, very valuable. My guess is, with documentation, the hammer price would be in the high five figures. I would not be surprised if it went into six figures. Again, if it is a natural emerald. That is why GIA documentation is critical, in my opinionn.

Do you have a contract with an auction house yet? If this a natural emerald, the top auctions houses would love to sell this for you. The specimen is that fabulous.

I hope this was helpful.
Happy New Yearr.
Molly

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From the picture it looks like North Carolina or Colombian Stock ( The matrix it’s in.) I’d have to do some spectrometer testing and Chelsa Testing to see the chromium content to tell you it’s origin. It would be most likely classified a Beryl/Emerald Display specimen. Possibly a Museum display piece. From the pictures it does not look like gem/facet material. It’s large for an emerald. It might possibly be Cabochon material but might be worth the most as a display piece. I could test and appraise it if you’d like. - Professional IGS Certified Gemologist ( Acquire Collectibles) ( aquirecollectibles@gmail.com)

One final thought. You have to be very careful that this is not dyed or treated in any way. Much of the to good to be true large specimens that have come in a round about way from India are Dyed! Beware! - Mike Acquire Collectibles

I would have it looked at by a certified gemologist. You can find one locally. If it has not been dyed or treated, I would send it off to GIA for certification. It would be well worth the cost. You would get world wide attention at any auction. The price would go through the roof before you know it. Gemologists would line up to take a look at that beauty for you. It’s not hard to test it for dyes and treatments. It should only take a good gemologist a few minutes to tell on a specimen that size. I have had clients buy them and bring them to me, so proud of their purchases only to find out in a matter of minutes that they have treated rocks.
Wishing you all the best.
Otter.

Hi Molly,

Thank you for your help and that’s a great idea! I just left a message with them and look forward to hearing what they have to say! Fingers crossed it comes back as natural! Thank you again!

Happy New Year as well!
Hudson